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MEDICAL MYSTERIES - THE GIRL WHO CAN NOT EAT (Documentary) Health/Discovery/Medical

MEDICAL MYSTERIES – THE GIRL WHO CAN NOT EAT (Documentary) Health/Discovery/Medical Tia Mcarthy has spent a decade being fed through a tube because she refus…

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Video Rating: 4 / 5

The idea of education as a factory is based on a 1988 article by Dr. Hermine Marshall, which can be found here: http://edr.sagepub.com/content/17/9/9.short M…
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Video Rating: 5 / 5

A Deeper Look into Mental Health (A Documentary about the harms of Psychiatry)

A group of four young adults spent one year, working to find out what is happening in the field of mental health in our communities. This is a brief introduction to their short documentary, “A Deeper Look Into Mental Health”. You can purchase the film here http: //www.cchrflorida.org/

In the Western world, social progressive values that began in the 1960s, such as increasing political awareness and political and economic liberty of women, continued to grow. The hippie culture, which started in the latter half of the 1960s, waned by the early 1970s and faded towards the middle part of the decade, which involved opposition to the Vietnam War, opposition to nuclear weapons, the advocacy of world peace, and hostility to the authority of government and big business. The environmentalist movement began to increase dramatically in this period. Novelist Tom Wolfe coined the term Me decade in his article “The “Me” Decade and the Third Great Awakening”, published by New York magazine in August 1976 referring to the 1970s. The term describes a general new attitude of Americans towards atomized individualism and away from communitarianism in clear contrast with the 1960s. Wolfe attributes disappearance of the “proletariat” with the appearance of the “lower middle class”, citing the economic boom of Post-War America as affording the average American a sort of self determination and individuation that ran alongside economic prosperity. Wolfe describes this abandoning of communal, left, and New Deal politics as “taking the money and running.” He traces the preoccupation with one’s self back to the aristocrat. The nature of the “chivalric tradition” and the philosophy behind “the finishing school” are inherently dedicated to the building and forming of personal
Video Rating: 4 / 5